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Queen Hera by Hera-of-Stockholm Queen Hera by Hera-of-Stockholm
For a long time now have I wanted to do my Olympian namesake, but never being able to really get it to work (started several times but was not pleased with the outcome.)

And then finally it came out right. So here she is, the Queen of Heaven, Hera of Olympos (not Stockholm - lol)

More about Hera: [link]

Stock for bg from :iconcsnyder: & :iconresurgere:
Planet Earth courtecy of NASA
3D items from DAZ, Renderocity, Runtime DNA, Synfulmindz
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:iconlumberlung:
lumberlung Featured By Owner Sep 29, 2014  Professional Writer
While looking at that celestial body (no, not Hera's), I began to wonder if the Olympus orbits it or if it is Olympus's satellite. Regardless of who orbits whom, when I noticed that it wasn't the moon but rather a planet with continents and bodies of water, I know what area of said planet would be below Olympus. And that's clever. It's important to assume that our audiences are smart and, as hard as it is sometimes, it's important to resist that temptation to point out how clever we are. You go out of your way to obscure the planet with that ostentatious fountain, and, speaking for myself, for the minute or so that I looked at this carefully I ignored that section of the picture because it is so close to Hera's face, which is a magnet for its beauty. I like how the color scheme of the tile beneath Hera's feet compliments her regalia, which I think is lovely. I certainly would not dare to suggest that you change anything about her garments, but I think a flash — and I mean just a bit — of leg would be most lovely.
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:iconhera-of-stockholm:
Hera-of-Stockholm Featured By Owner Sep 30, 2014
Yes, it is Earth out there in space behind the fountain - glad you spotted it. I was intentionally not making it easy, because the main focus was the queen of gods herself. But I love to add those little details that may tell a story into my picture and see if someone spots them and make something out of them. Always gives me the thrill when people does.
And yes, the idea is that Olympos orbits Earth in a way, but in some kind of parrallell dimension, so that you can see the planet and the stars and all the universe at the same time as this place follows it own laws, since it plows trough the Aether and is inhibited by immortal beings, who appears only superficially similar to us - yet at the same time are able to live together with us humans nd understand us and even procreate with us. And since perfection and paradise tend to get boring after a while, they come down to our world now and then instead and engage in it.
Finally, I'm not done with Hera yet, she might get some more revealing outfit later on :) :glomp:
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:iconlumberlung:
lumberlung Featured By Owner Sep 30, 2014  Professional Writer
I'm not done with Hera yet, she might get some more revealing outfit later on
That would be excellent. Of course, you have to understand that my question is academic. Did Hera really believe that she could compete with Athena and, more importantly, Aphrodite? The goddesses and gods of Olympus are not known for being all that rational, but Hera's pride seems to doesn't seem to be enough to drive her actions: indeed, I have to question whether or not she is of sound or unsound mind.

However, if it turned out that, like Paris, we have been deceived all these years by Hera's hidden hotness, it would incite one the most significant revolutions in classical studies since Schliemann unearthed Troy itself.
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:iconhera-of-stockholm:
Hera-of-Stockholm Featured By Owner Oct 2, 2014
I believe about that competition that each of the goddesses were wain. They all believed that they were the most striking beauty, and as a matter of fact, that question was not settled, because they all cheated and tried to push in other goodies in the basked. What surprises me most in this story though is not Hera's actions, but Athena's. Yes, Athena's a striking woman, but one would think that she - more insterested in war and in logic and reason - would not care the slightest about such a competition. That she would just shrug it off and go read a book about giraffes instead. Then again, perhaps it was just the concept of a competition that triggered her. She loved to win after all.
Then there is Paris himself. He seems to be thinking with the wrong body part. After all if he had picked Athena, he'd be victorious in war and then he could've conquered Sparta and had Helen anyway. But perhaps he lost it totally when standing in front of all those goddesses.
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:iconlumberlung:
lumberlung Featured By Owner Oct 6, 2014  Professional Writer
As you yourself have written, there is no right or wrong to any of this. Most Greek myths — any myth or legend, really — don't and can't stand up to realistic scrutiny, nor were they meant to do that. Different deities had different stories told about them in different regions, and one culture's deities would often be conflated with another's culture's, but those two deities have conflicting personality traits and narratives. The same thing can be seen in The Bible: the Old Testament God (who is not always consistent in His behavior) is portrayed very differently from the New Testament God.

I often think that a better way to look at the Greek myths is thinking of how people view the Bible. To look for realism and rationalism everywhere is impossible, and to take it literally is, in my personal opinion, dangerous. The rub is that since the time when Greek myths have been abandoned as religious parables, these stories have been adopted as literature and the inspiration for derivative works of literature. If one looks at the history of narrative in western society, readers (or listeners, or the audience of a play), don't start to demand what we consider "realism" until the 17th century, but, by the time that this happens, we twenty-five hundred years of literary tradition intertwined with the western canon that we can't just toss out. Hence, we're often told that "the gods are unpredictable and capricious" and the like to excuse their erratic and inconsistent behavior.
Then there is Paris himself. He seems to be thinking with the wrong body part. After all if he had picked Athena, he'd be victorious in war and then he could've conquered Sparta and had Helen anyway. But perhaps he lost it totally when standing in front of all those goddesses.
I don't have a realistic hypothesis for Hera and Athena competing against Aphrodite in the contest, but, without time to walk away, cool down, and think rationally about his decision, I can assure you, as a man, that his choice is completely believable. 

=P (Razz) 
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:iconhera-of-stockholm:
Hera-of-Stockholm Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2014
You're right about Paris - one have to recall that he was an adolescent as well at that time, so that he disconnected his brain was fullt understandable :D

I tend to see  the myths both as cult stories to explain things going on in nature like the passage of seasons (the Persephone saga) as well as reflections of usselves as well. Take the Persephone saga again, you have the overprotecting mother in Demeter, the revolting, risk-taking teenager in Persephone, the exciting dark stranger as well as missunderstood son in law (Hades), the absent father (Zeus) and a lot of other things having bearing upon human relations.

The same thing goes for Leto and her twins. The woman who draws the shortest strand in the competition for a man, and ends up standing there shouting "It should have been me." www.youtube.com/watch?v=eRZ_7l…  . Or Aphrodite between the two men who end up chosing Hephaestos over his more handsome brother Ares, probably because the former was kinder and because he built while Ares destroyed. I think that tale should give every geek hope ;)

And finally there's the good old adventure stories with people going on quests and beating up badasses and bringing home tressures and mates. We still have them today. But the Greeks didn't stop with the 'happily-ever-after'-kissing, and that's what I like about them. They were as eager to picture the relation going wrong afterwards. Look at Heracles accidently killing both wife and kids, Theseus having second thought and dumping his princess halfway home or Medea, the foreign princess who never did fit in or found acceptance in her new land (how usual isn't that) and in the end found herself spurned for a local beauty.

And the bible - of corse it's inconsistent because it's an anthology, written by several people during thousands and thousands of years. The old testament is based upon the jewish Torah, telling one story, mostly about the glory of the Jewish people, just like every nation have their stories of glory and heroes. Then there's the new testament, put together about the Romans and about Jesus C mostly to spin a new religion. And thus picking some historian records about real people like Pontus Pilates and king Herodes and spicing up with some who might've been fictious like Lasarus. And who knows what was real about Jesus. If it even was the same guy all the time.
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:iconlumberlung:
lumberlung Featured By Owner Oct 13, 2014  Professional Writer
You're right about Paris - one have to recall that he was an adolescent as well at that time, so that he disconnected his brain was fullt understandable  

I'm sorry to be the one to tell you this, Hera, but Paris's behavior has less to do with his age and more to do with his gender. Men (most men) just become a bit better at hiding our inability to resist women as we grow older.

:D (Big Grin) 

I tend to see  the myths both as cult stories to explain things going on in nature like the passage of seasons (the Persephone saga) as well as reflections of usselves as well. Take the Persephone saga again, you have the overprotecting mother in Demeter, the revolting, risk-taking teenager in Persephone, the exciting dark stranger as well as missunderstood son in law (Hades), the absent father (Zeus) and a lot of other things having bearing upon human relations.

I certainly agree with you about myths beginning as cult stories told to explain natural phenomena (or stories told about historical individuals, the ancestors of the storytellers that, over time, are exaggerated and composited).

That said, I'm not on board with this interpretation of the Persephone myth. Persephone was abducted by Hades, and after being taken against her will to the underworld, Hades deliberately deceives her by tricking into eating pomegranate seeds that will tie her to Hell forever. But this is not a rogue action: Hades act is sanctioned by Persephone's father, Zeus, who grants his brother permission to abduct his daughter against her wishes. I'll grant you that the story does use the absent father motif, but I don't agree that Demeter is an over-protective mother. A good and loving mother ought to be outraged if her daughter is abducted — especially if she were to discover that her daughter's father had arranged what amounts to a kidnapping. Given this, it seems that Demeter had the correct instinct when she cloistered Persephone on Sicily. Persephone is grief-stricken both by her abduction and by the judgement of Zeus that forces her (against her will) to marry Hades and to live (three or) four (or six) months in the underworld with him. Eventually, Persephone casts off her sorrow and bears her responsibility as Queen of Hades with dignity and grace, but we could read her acceptance of her fate as a case of Stockholm syndrome.

From a structuralist perspective, this story could have roots in an historical fall of the matriarchy. Hades could be read as a powerful man who ruled a migrating, patriarchal tribe in search of a new homeland (perhaps during the Dorian invasion, or another incursion similar to it), which they found in Mycenaean Greece. Demeter may have been the matriarch of a society that already inhabited a portion of Mycenaean Greece who could not stand against the force of Hades. Zeus could have been a male figure of some stature — perhaps Demeter's husband — who negotiated with the invaders and secured a peace that allowed both peoples to share the land in question and to become one nation that shifted to a patriarchal organization solidified by the marriage of Hades and Queen Demeter's daughter, Persephone. Were Persephone an actual historic figure, the princess and heir apparent of a matriarchal society, she most certainly would be angered and saddened, both, to be "given" away by a man to a man just as were her people given to the invading men.

I had a conversation about Persephone with someone else a week or two ago, and she referred to Persephone's abduction as "romantic," which I find disturbing. Persephone's story is tragic. Her abduction, as a recurring trope in
western art, is commonly named "The Rape of Persephone," and to view it as romantic is ultimately to turn it into a rape fantasy (c.f., Margaret Atwood's "Rape Fantasies" in her book Dancing Girls).

And the bible - of corse it's inconsistent because it's an anthology, written by several people during thousands and thousands of years. The old testament is based upon the jewish Torah, telling one story, mostly about the glory of the Jewish people, just like every nation have their stories of glory and heroes. Then there's the new testament, put together about the Romans and about Jesus C mostly to spin a new religion. And thus picking some historian records about real people like Pontus Pilates and king Herodes and spicing up with some who might've been fictious like Lasarus. And who knows what was real about Jesus. If it even was the same guy all the time.

Of course the Bible is an anthology. Its four most important books are the four Gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John, which relate, from four different points of view, the history of Jesus Christ. Similarly, many human authors are responsible for all the other books of the Bible even though, in most cases, we can't know who they were. But the Bible's assemblage is exceptionally complicated.

Consider the vast amount of apocrypha that exist both in the Jewish and the Christian traditions. Why are there only four gospels in the New Testament. Why exclude the Gospel of Thomas or the Gospel of Judas? Believers believe, just as the Bible was written by God channeling Himself through those who wrote the divine scripture, that God wold also have guided the collection of the texts which are now considered canonical. All else is false testimony.

If someone believes that, it is her or his prerogative to believe that, but others, myself included, would suggest that the compilation of the Bible came down to theological disputes that were governed by political concerns. Whoever could lay claim to knowing the Word of God could lay claim to authenticity over another Christian sect. The Gnostic scriptures are a (I'd say the) prime example of this: they were a competing sect of Christianity that had a relatively large following and appeal, but they were stamped out by the Bishop of Rome and their teachings were lost to the main of society and hidden away. Not only were works themselves hidden and destroyed, by significant debate and negotiations — done by mortal men — went into the selection of the books that remained known and available, and the choices that were made carried political implications. If you were a bishop whose churches focused upon the teachings of Thomas, the excision of his gospel would rob you of power when it was claimed apocryphal and your parishioners threatened with excommunication if they did not fall in line with the Church of Rome.

And then there is the problem of translation. Were we to begin with a book originally written in Hebrew, it would have likely been translated next into Greek, and, next, it would have been translated into Latin. But it's not that simple. There would be many different copies of Genesis floating around and there would be different translators working on these different versions, and thus grows the tree of genesis with all its branches that spring from the same root but are different in form. I can't speak for other languages, but all hell breaks loose when the Bible was finally translated into the English vulgate. Scholars today have far more to argue over than the accuracy of the King James Bible when compared to its Latin original (which is not the "original" at all).

I'll toss one final problem into the mix. When we say that there are many authors of the Bible, we think of authors like Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John who purported wrote the books the Bible says that they did. But what if multiple authors wrote single books of the Bible? There is a compelling hypothesis called the "documentary hypothesis" that argues that there were at least four different authors of the Pentateuch, whom scholars refer to a J, E, D, and P. Each would have written (or rewritten) the Pentateuch at a different time and in a different place in a time period speculated to be between 1000 BCD and 500 BCE. This differs from what I wrote above about their potentially being many different copies of books that were slightly different in word and content. The first writer mentioned, J, referred to as the "Yahwist source" could have written "the first draft," or she or he could have taken the Pentateuch written by "Moses" and actively revised it. Whatever happened, the J text would then fall into the hands of the E writer who would edit and add to the J text. The same would happen with D and with P. Some things would stay, some things would go, some things would be edited, and some things would be added. By looking at the language on the Pentateuch through lenses philological and linguistic, the scholars who support this hypothesis believe that they can identify four distinct voices at work in the Pentateuch that reveal it to be a palimpsest.

When I pick up an English translation of the Bible, one could argue that, after millennia, its text is complete and true because God has finally managed to move that text through enough writers and editors so that it has reached the point of divine perfection. But I think that it is far more likely that every time we pick up not the Bible, but a  Bible, we pick up a book that has taken three thousand years to write and has been written by hundreds, if not thousands of people, each person unique in personality and beliefs theological and political and scientific, over those three millennia.

Such would be the same with regard to the Greek myths but for that, for many years, they were transmitted by telling and listening rather than writing and reading.
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:iconhera-of-stockholm:
Hera-of-Stockholm Featured By Owner Oct 14, 2014
That's intersting, I believe there are almost as many interpretations of the myths as there are readers. And the way I see it the 'us' variation could be there with some people while not with others, although I'm more inclined on seeing them as mere cult tales and explanations of the movements of the stars and the passing of the seasons and such. The Hades / Persephone isn't originally not mine, which I forgot to mention, they're from Vidar Durant, a French pshycologist  from the 80ies who digged rather deep down in the myths, both the European ones and the Middle Eastern ones. She wrote a lot about archetypes and such, and tried to straight out such 'classics' as Cinderella, Munchausen, the Holy Grail (as a womb) and so on.

When it comes to the bible, a lot can be said about its origin(s) and I'm possibly certain that we'll never compile a real original. Especially since there are 'new' things found all the time, like the Dead Sea Rolls and similar artefacts. As well as traces of origins to other places of the world. Like the tale with Iskariotr the traitor, that one has been compared to African myths which are almost scarily similar. Also the many connections between Jesus and Dionysos or Jesus and Baldur. Both were the sons to the top god, both were connected to wine and grew up among humans, both were betrayed by their own and imprisoned and then killed in terrible ways and finally raised from the death. And both Jesus and Baldur were virgin births (at least according to some Baldur myths). And in the old testament, there are the story of Jericho for instance, which has a counterpart in India. I could go on, but the point I'm willing to make is that most of these stories are so saturated by Western culture and parts of African and Western Asian as well, that they have been impossible to take apart and de-construct without taking apart the very foundation they are built upon too. And that takes more than a life time and quite of a fortune to aquire.

Thus I don't understand people taking the bible as face value. You just have to read it once, or parts of it to even notice how full it is of contradictions. And that's where I rest my speak in that case. :phew:

Finally not even the jewish Torah is consistent :D
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:iconrozesall:
rozesall Featured By Owner Apr 30, 2014  Professional Traditional Artist
Just to say that you were featured on: 

basic3dtraining.com/3d-feature…

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:iconhera-of-stockholm:
Hera-of-Stockholm Featured By Owner Apr 30, 2014
:) Thanks a lot, I'm honored :tighthug:
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